We Are Woman: March 2012 March 2012 ~ We Are Woman March 2012 ~ We Are Woman

The Four Funniest Responses to the War on Women

by Jessica DelBalzo


Abraham Lincoln said, “I laugh because I must not cry.”

Surely, the War on Women is enough to bring any self-respecting woman to tears. One might even say that attitudes of paternalism and misogyny are nothing to laugh at. However, many women (and some men) have come up with clever ways to use humor as a weapon, roasting conservatives with hilarious tactics that illustrate the absurdity surrounding their efforts to deny us our basic freedoms. What follows are some of the funniest ways women are fighting back.
  1. Crafting for a Cause: Feminist knitters and crocheters have joined forces to provide “A Uterus for Every Congressman”. Using simple patterns, volunteers are organizing to deliver wombs and vulvas to the politicians who are obsessed with policing them. The theory is, of course, that if these men had their own lady parts to focus on, they might decide to leave ours alone.

  2. Making a (Funny) Point with Counter-Legislation: When they finish their terms in office, legislators like Oklahoma Senator Constance Johnson, Ohio Senator Nina Turner, and Virginia Senator Janet Howell may want to take their comedic show on the road. Illustrating the ridiculousness of proposed “personhood” amendments and ultrasound laws by proposing similar legislation aimed at men's vasectomies, Viagra prescriptions, and masturbatory habits, these women have given us a show of solidarity that nets a big smile from women's rights activists.

  3. Handy Flowcharts: After political pundit Rush Limbaugh called birth control advocate Sandra Fluke a slut, feminist allies Tim Murphy and Ben Breedlove decided to simplify things with a convenient chart. Simply answer the questions as you go, and you're on your way to determining your own slut potential. If you're less into charts and graphs and more into cute kitties, you can opt for the click-through quiz instead. Here's a hint: if you're reading this, you're probably a slut.

  4. TMI Facebook Campaigns: The male legislators who want to pass laws restricting birth control and preventing abortion are obviously quite concerned about the state of your uterus. Until you can knit them their own, consider giving them an update about yours via Facebook. That's what hundreds of bold women did to Rick Perry, Ryan McDougle, and others. While this particular tactic is unlikely to do anything but annoy those pesky politicians, it's a fun way for women to fight back against the men who want to legislate their bodies.
Did nosy state or federal representatives inspire you to create a funny graphic or write a funny article? Share it with us. Fighting the War on Women requires strength, time, and dedication, but a good laugh can motivate us onward!

New Poster for the We Are Woman March on Washington

Click for Large Full Resolution Image

The Equal Rights Amendment, first proposed in 1923 to affirm that women and men have equal rights under the law, is still not part of the U.S. Constitution. 

The ERA was passed out of Congress in 1972 and has been ratified by 35 of the necessary 38 states.  When three more states vote yes, it is possible that the ERA could become the 28th Amendment. The ERA could also be ratified by restarting the traditional process of passage by a two-thirds majority in the Senate and the House of Representatives, followed by ratification by legislatures in three-quarters (38) of the 50 states.

Source:

The ERA in Congress
112th Session (2011-2012)

On June 22, 2011, ERA ratification bills were introduced in the Senate (S.J.Res. 21) by lead sponsor Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ) and in the House of Representatives (H.J. Res. 69) by lead sponsor Representative Carolyn Maloney (D-NY).

On Mar. 8, 2011, Representative Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) introduced H.J.Res 47, which would remove the ERA’s ratification deadline and make it part of the Constitution when three more states ratify.

Source:


New Poster for the We Are Woman March on Washington

Click for Large Full Resolution Image



Our Mission Statement

We are marching for Rights affecting:
  • Our bodies
  • Our health
  • Our families
  • Our livelihood
  • Our future
Women's rights are human rights.

Click Here to read our bios.

Mission Statement

Our mission is to bring national attention to the ongoing war on women's rights being fought by conservative representatives in federal and state legislatures throughout the country. We believe that women have the right to control their own bodies, make their own decisions about healthcare, receive equal pay for equal work, and be treated with respect by the men and women who represent them in their own state houses and in Washington.  Women are not a special interest group seeking special privileges; we comprise 50% of the population, and we are citizens deserving of the same freedoms and protections awarded to our male counterparts.  We Are Woman supports the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment and the restoration of all the rights that have been limited or destroyed by governors and other legislators across the nation.  It is our goal to bring thousands of men and women together at the Capitol on August 18th, 2012, to tell our politicians, "No more!"  We are strong, powerful, loving and brave. We are America. We Are Woman.

Our Goals and Inspirations
Erin Nanasi of Mad Mike’s America helped to craft the following:

Since November of 2010, over 1,100 pieces of legislation have been introduced that have nothing to do with jobs or the economy or solving any real problems in America. These 1,100 pieces of legislation are all about one thing: ending women’s rights as we know them.

Birth control, health care, the right to choose, attaching stigmas to single mothers, reducing or eliminating WIC, SNAP and Medicaid: All of these have been the focus of the new Congress and State Legislatures. From Missisippi to Michigan, governors have been treating women more like livestock to be regulated than human beings to be respected.

We Are Woman is inspired by those 1,100 pieces of legislation. We are inspired by plans for the National Women’s History Museum. We are inspired by the hundreds of emails we receive every day, joining with others all over the country to stand shoulder to shoulder and shout, "NO MORE". We are inspired by Mary Wollstonecraft, Abigail Adams, Phyllis Wheatley, Margaret Fuller, Sojourner Truth, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, Harriet Tubman, Elizabeth Blackwell, Susan B. Anthony, Clara Barton, Sarah Winnemucca, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ida B. Wells, Jane Addams, Mary McLeod Bethune, Carrie Chapman Catt, Margaret Sanger, Inez Milholland, Alice Paul, Frances Perkins, Eleanor Roosevelt, Margaret Chase Smith, Rosa Parks, Betty Friedan, Coretta Scott King, Gloria Steinem, Shirley Chisolm, Barbara Jordan, Sandra Day O’Conner, Wilma Mankiller, Geraldine Ferraro, Nancy Pelosi, and Hillary Clinton. We are moved by the stories of women who fought, often beaten, sometimes killed, for equal rights, voting rights, and the right to protect our own health. We are called to action, complacent no longer.

The goal of We Are Woman is to draw national and worldwide attention to the facts. In just the past two years, we have seen 1,100 pieces of anti-woman legislation, have heard women being called “sluts” and “prostitutes,” have seen birth control attacked, Roe v Wade threatened, and the rise of personhood laws that criminalize miscarriages and demonize women. The facts are clear: This is a war on women, and we will fight back. We Are Woman is firm in our resolve and committed to a non violent protest and march on Washington, DC. In order to be heard, we need not be violent and we must not be destructive; we will be more effective if we are the polar opposite of the new Congress and State Legislatures.

From America’s Beginning to the Future
Edrie Irvine helped to craft the following:

From the earliest founders of this country, to the Women’s Rights movement of the 1840s, to the suffragettes in the early 1900s, to the feminists of the 1960s and 70s to the 21st century’s first female Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, we have shared in the birth, growth, and life of the United States. Today, in 2012, Americans sometimes forget the role of women in this nation’s history and future.

We Are Woman celebrates our role in the birth and success of America. We are revitalized today to fight for the full and equal rights of all women, and we look to a future where the next generations of women are treated with dignity and respect. We Are Woman wants to fulfill a promise: the promise that our equal protection, our equal participation will be attained and that we will be recognized, not as a “special interest” or an “issue” to be ignored or placated, but as women. Strong, powerful, loving and brave women. We are America. We Are Woman.

Click Here for High Resolution Image


We Are Woman: Our goals and inspirations

by Erin Nanasi

Since November of 2010, over 1,100 pieces of legislation have been introduced that have nothing to do with jobs or the economy or solving any real problems in America. These 1,100 pieces of legislation are all about one thing: ending women’s rights as we know them.

Birth control, health care, the right to choose, attaching stigmas to single mothers, reducing or eliminating WIC, SNAP and Medicaid. All of these have been the focus of the new GOP. A female politician from Kansas thinks women shouldn’t vote, but should be home tending to our domestic duties. A Georgia representative compared us to livestock, and a Pennsylvania governor wants women to just close their eyes during a government mandated ultrasound.

We Are Woman is inspired by those 1,100 pieces of legislation. We are inspired by plans for the National Women’s History Museum. We are inspired by the hundreds of emails we receive every day, joining with others all over the country to stand shoulder to shoulder and shout NO MORE. We are inspired by Clara Barton, Harriet Tubman, Susan B. Anthony, Eleanor Roosevelt, WAC, Coretta Scott King, Gloria Steinem, Betty Friedan, Geraldine Ferraro and Hillary Clinton. We are moved by the stories of women who fought, often beaten, sometimes killed, for equal rights, voting rights, and the right to protect our own health. We are called to action, complacent no longer.

In the past year and a half, the new GOP has attempted to minimize domestic violence and redefine rape. Ron Paul spoke of “honest rape.” What is that, sir? Would my rape have qualified? I only had bruises on my neck and thighs, I didn’t fight back because I was terrified, as so many women are during their attack-would that be an “honest rape?” A “forcible rape?” Are we willing, as women, to close our eyes any longer?

The goal of We Are Woman is to draw national and worldwide attention to the facts. 1,100 pieces of legislation, women being called “sluts” and “prostitutes,” birth control mandates, politicians like Rand Paul and Rick Santorum actively working to overthrow Roe V Wade, personhood laws, fetal pain laws. The facts are clear, the evidence is front and center. This is in fact a war on women, and we will fight back. We refuse to use violence or rhetoric or incendiary comments or lies to win. We Are Woman is firm in our resolve and committed to a non violent protest and march on Washington, DC. In order to be heard, we need not be violent, we need not be destructive; in fact our message will be heard more clearly if we are the polar opposite of the new GOP.

Edrie Irvine, a team leader for We Are Woman and a truly gifted and passionate advocate, helped craft the following statement. I cannot think of a more fitting end to this piece.

From America’s Beginning to the Future

From the earliest founders of this country, to the suffragettes in the early 1900’s, to Rosie the Riveter in the 1940’s to the early feminists of the 1960’s and 70’s to the 21st century’s first female Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, we have shared in the birth, growth and life of these United States. Today, in 2012, Americans sometimes forget to appreciate fully the role of women in this nation’s history and future.

We Are Woman celebrates our role in the birth and success of America. We are revitalized today to fight for the full and equal rights of all women, and we look to a future where the next generations of women are treated with dignity and respect. We Are Woman wants to fulfill a promise; the promise that our equal protection, our equal participation will be attained and that we will be recognized, not as a “special interest” or an “issue” to be ignored or placated, but as women. Strong, powerful, loving and brave women. We are America. We Are Woman.

Original article, by Erin Nanasi, from MADMIKESAMERICA

From the Frontlines - Women Don't Know if They've Been Raped?

by Jessica DelBalzo

Before he was assassinated by self-proclaimed “pro-life” extremists, Dr. George Tiller wore a button to work each day that said simply, “Trust women.” That short but profound phrase has become popular among reproductive rights activists as they work carry on his legacy ensuring that women have access to birth control and abortion services.

Unlike Dr. Tiller, the GOP does not trust women.

Conservative distrust for women was evident when the House Oversight and Government Reform committee conducted a hearing on birth control without any women on the panel. It's present every time another state attempts to pass a “personhood” amendment to ban abortion. It's present in laws requiring women to undergo invasive transvaginal ultrasounds, mandating that they view the screen and hear details of the fetus, as if they might not comprehend what pregnancy is without a vivid description.

And distrust is certainly present in the Idaho debate over a yet another ultrasound law. Defending the bill on Monday, Senator Chuck Winder suggested that women may not even understand when they've been raped. In his own words, Winder said, “I would hope that when a woman goes in to a physician with a rape issue, that physician will indeed ask her about perhaps her marriage, was this pregnancy caused by normal relations in a marriage or was it truly caused by a rape.”

His patronizing tone comes through in print every bit as much as it must have on the Senate floor. Not only does he trivialize sexual assault by referring to women as having “rape issues,” but he seems to genuinely believe that a woman might need her doctor to help sort out whether or not she was actually violated. Not only does the GOP think we lack the mental faculties to visualize the biological process of pregnancy without a fuzzy picture to guide us, but now they assert that we are also unable to assess our own sexual experiences.

As these distrustful, misogynistic measures make their way through state houses across the nation, it is more important than ever that women raise their voices to demand equality and respect. We cannot allow conservative politicians to speak for us, nor to deprive us of our freedom. Sign up to march with us today.

The History of Women's Rights in the United States

Suffragist Parade in New York City, May 1912
1700's

1701 The first sexually integrated jury hears cases in Albany, New York.

1769 American colonies based their laws on the English common law, which was summarized in the Blackstone Commentaries. It said, “By marriage, the husband and wife are one person in the law? The very being and legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated into that of her husband under whose wing and protection she performs everything.”

1777 All states pass laws which take away women’s right to vote.

1789 United States Constitution ratified. The terms “persons,” “people” and “electors” are used, allowing the interpretation of those beings to include men and women.

1800's

1839 The first state (Mississippi) grants women the right to hold property in their own name, with their husbands’ permission.

1848 At Seneca Falls, New York, 300 women and men sign the Declaration of Sentiments, a plea for the end of discrimination against women in all spheres of society.

1855 In Missouri v. Celia, a Slave, a Black woman is declared to be property without a right to defend herself against a master's act of rape.

Women's Suffrage in Wyoming
1866 The 14th Amendment is passed by Congress (ratified by the states in 1868), saying “Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective members, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. . . .But when the right to vote . . .is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State . . . the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in proportion.” It is the first time “citizens” and “voters” are defined as “male” in the Constitution.

1869 The first woman suffrage law in the U.S. is passed in the territory of Wyoming.

1870 The 15th Amendment receives final ratification, saying, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” By its text, women are not specifically excluded from the vote.

1870 The first sexually integrated grand jury hears cases in Cheyenne, Wyoming. The chief justice stops a motion to prohibit the integration of the jury, stating: “It seems to be eminently proper for women to sit upon Grand Juries, which will give them the best possible opportunities to aid in suppressing the dens of infamy which curse the country."

1873 Bradwell v. Illinois, 83 U.S. 130 (1872): The U.S. Supreme Court rules that a state has the right to exclude a married woman (Myra Colby Bradwell) from practicing law.

1875 Minor v Happersett, 88 U.S. 162 (1875): The U.S. Supreme Court declares that despite the privileges and immunities clause, a state can prohibit a woman from voting. The court declares women as “persons,” but holds that they constitute a “special category of _nonvoting_ citizens."

1879 Through special Congressional legislation, Belva Lockwood becomes first woman admitted to try a case before the Supreme Court.

1890 The first state (Wyoming) grants women the right to vote in all elections.

1910-1920

Ladies in Washington campaign for women's rights
1900 By now, every state has passed legislation modeled after New York’s Married Women’s Property Act (1848), granting married women some control over their property and earnings.

1908 Muller v State of Oregon, 208 U.S. 412 (1908): The U.S. Supreme Court upholds Oregon’s 10-hour workday for women. The win is a two-edged sword: the protective legislation implies that women are physically weak.

1916 Margaret Sanger tests the validity of New York’s anti-contraception law by establishing a clinic in Brooklyn. The most well-known of birth control advocates, she is one of hundreds arrested over a 40-year period for working to establish women’s right to control their own bodies.

1918 New York v. Sanger, 222 NY 192, 118 N.E. 637 (Court of Appeals 1917), National Archives, Records of the U.S. Supreme Court, RG 267 (MSDME-CDS C 15:298). Margaret Sanger wins her suit in New York to allow doctors to advise their married patients about birth control for health purposes.

1920's

Members of the National Council
of the Womans Party honor the birthday
 of Susan B. Anthony by placing a
 wreath on the statue in the U.S. Capitol.
1920 The Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is ratified. It declares: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.”

1923 National Woman’s Party proposes Constitutional amendment: “Men and women shall have equal rights throughout the United States and in every place subject to its jurisdiction. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”

1924 Radice v. New York, a New York state case, upholds a law that forbade waitresses from working the night shift but made an exception for entertainers and ladies' room attendants.

1925 American Indian suffrage granted by act of Congress.

1930's

1932 The National Recovery Act forbids more than one family member from holding a government job, resulting in many women losing their jobs.

1936 United States v. One Package of Japanese Pessaries, 13 F. Supp.334 (E.D.N.Y 1936) aff’d 86 F 2d 737 (2nd Cir. 1936), won judicial approval of medicinal use of birth control.

1937 The U.S. Supreme Court upholds Washington state’s minimum wage laws for women.

1938 The Fair Labor Standards Act establishes minimum wage without regard to sex.

1940's

1947 Fay v. New York, 332 U.S. 261 (1947), the U.S. Supreme Court says women are equally qualified with men to serve on juries but are granted an exemption and may serve or not as women choose.

1960's

Members of NOW picket
 the headquarters of New York
 mayoralty candidates
1961 In Hoyt v. Florida, 368 U.S. 57 (1961): The U.S. Supreme Court upholds rules adopted by the state of Florida that made it far less likely for women than men to be called for jury service on the grounds that a “woman is still regarded as the center of home and family life.”

1963 The Equal Pay Act is passed by Congress, promising equitable wages for the same work, regardless of the race, color, religion, national origin or sex of the worker.

1964 Title VII of the Civil Rights Act passes including a prohibition against employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex.

1965 Weeks v. Southern Bell, 408 F. 2d. 228 (5th Cir. 1969), marks a major triumph in the fight against restrictive labor laws and company regulations on the hours and conditions of women's work, opening many previously male-only jobs to women.

In Griswold v Connecticut, 381 U.S. 479 (1965), the Supreme Court overturns one of the last state laws prohibiting the prescription or use of contraceptives by married couples.

1968 Executive Order 11246 prohibits sex discrimination by government contractors and requires affirmative action plans for hiring women.

1969 In Bowe v. Colgate-Palmolive Company, 416 F. 2d 711 (7th Cir.1969), the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals rules that women meeting the physical requirements can work in many jobs that had been for men only.

California adopts the nation’s first “no fault” divorce law, allowing divorce by mutual consent.

1970's

1971 Phillips v. Martin Marietta Corporation, 400 U.S. 542 (1971): The U.S. Supreme Court outlaws the practice of private employers refusing to hire women with pre-school children.

Reed v. Reed, 404 U.S. 71 (1971): The U.S. Supreme Court holds unconstitutional a state law (Idaho) establishing automatic preference for males as administrators of wills. This is the first time the court strikes down a law treating men and women differently. The Court finally declares women as “persons,” but uses a “reasonableness” test rather than making sex a “suspect classification,” analogous to race, under the Fourteenth Amendment.

1972 Title IX (Public Law 92-318) of the Education Amendments prohibits sex discrimination in all aspects of education programs that receive federal support.

In Eisenstadt v. Baird, 405 U.S. 438 (1972), the Supreme Court rules that the right to privacy encompasses an unmarried person's right to use contraceptives.

1973 Pittsburgh Press v. Pittsburgh Commission on Human Relations, 413 U.S. 376 (1973): The U.S. Supreme Court bans sex-segregated “help wanted” advertising as a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended.

Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973) and Doe v. Bolton, 410 U.S. 179 (1973): The U.S. Supreme Court declares that the Constitution protects women’s right to terminate an early pregnancy, thus making abortion legal in the U.S.

1974 Housing discrimination on the basis of sex and credit discrimination against women are outlawed by Congress.

Cleveland Board of Education v. LaFleur, 414 U.S. 632 (1974), determines it is illegal to force pregnant women to take maternity leave on the assumption they are incapable of working in their physical condition.

The Women’s Educational Equity Act, drafted by Arlene Horowitz and introduced by Representative Patsy Mink (D-HI), funds the development of nonsexist teaching materials and model programs that encourage full educational opportunities for girls and women.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Justice and Labor Departments, and AT&T sign a consent decree banning AT&T’s discriminatory practices against women and minorities.

1975 Taylor v. Louisiana, 419 U.S. 522 (1975), denies states the right to exclude women from juries.

1976 General Elec. Co v. Gilbert, 429 U. S. 125 (1976), the Supreme Court upholds women’s right to unemployment benefits during the last three months of pregnancy.

Craig v. Boren, 429 U.S. 190 (1976): The U.S. Supreme Court declares unconstitutional a state law permitting 18 to 20-year-old females to drink beer while denying the rights to men of the same age. The Court establishes new set of standards for reviewing laws that treat men and women differently—an “intermediate” test stricter than the “reasonableness” test for constitutionality in sex discrimination cases.

1978 The Pregnancy Discrimination Act bans employment discrimination against pregnant women.

1980's

1981 The U.S. Supreme Court rules that excluding women from the draft is constitutional.

Kirchberg v. Feenstra, 450 U.S. 455, 459-60 (1981), overturns state laws designating a husband “head and master” with unilateral control of property owned jointly with his wife.

Carol Moore Pro Choice
1984 In Roberts v. U.S. Jaycees, 468 U.S. 609 (1984), sex discrimination in membership policies of organizations, such as the Jaycees, is forbidden by the Supreme Court, opening many previously all-male organizations (Jaycees, Kiwanis, Rotary, Lions) to women.

The state of Mississippi belatedly ratifies the 19th Amendment, granting women the vote.

Hishon v. King and Spaulding, 467 U.S. 69 (1984): The U.S. Supreme Court rules that law firms may not discriminate on the basis of sex in promoting lawyers to partnership positions.

1986 In Meritor Savings Bank v. Vinson, 477 U.S. 57 (1986), the U.S. Supreme Court held that a hostile or abusive work environment can prove discrimination based on sex.

1987 Johnson v. Santa Clara County, 480 U.S. 616 (1987): The U.S. Supreme Court rules that it is permissible to take sex and race into account in employment decisions even where there is no proven history of discrimination but when evidence of a manifest imbalance exists in the number of women or minorities holding the position in question.

1989 In Webster v. Reproductive Health Services, 492 U.S. 490 (1989), the Supreme Court affirms the right of states to deny public funding for abortions and to prohibit public hospitals from performing abortions.

1990's

1993 Harris v. Forklift Systems, Inc., 510 U.S. 17 (1993) The U.S. Supreme Court rules that the victim did not need to show that she suffered physical or serious psychological injury as a result of sexual harassment.

The Family and Medical Leave Act goes into effect.

1994 Congress adopts the Gender Equity in Education Act to train teachers in gender equity, promote math and science learning by girls, counsel pregnant teens, and prevent sexual harassment.

The Violence Against Women Act funds services for victims of rape and domestic violence, allows women to seek civil rights remedies for gender-related crimes, provides training to increase police and court officials’ sensitivity and a national 24-hour hotline for battered women.

1996 United States v. Virginia, 518 U.S. 515 (1996), affirms that the male-only admissions policy of the state-supported Virginia Military Institute violates the Fourteenth Amendment.

1997 Elaborating on Title IX, the Supreme Court rules that college athletics programs must actively involve roughly equal numbers of men and women to qualify for federal support.

1998 Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America agrees to pay $34 million to settle an E.E.O.C. lawsuit contending that hundreds of women were sexually harassed.

Burlington Industries, Inc. v. Ellerth, 524 U.S. 742 (1998) and Faragher v. City of Boca Raton, 524 U.S. 742 (1998): The Supreme Court balances employee and employer rights. It rules that employers are liable for sexual harassment even in instances when a supervisor’s threats are not carried out. But the employer can defend itself by showing that it took steps to prevent or promptly correct any sexually harassing behavior and the employee did not take advantage of available opportunities to stop the behavior or complain of the behavior.

21st Century

2000 CBS Broadcasting agrees to pay $8 million to settle a sex discrimination lawsuit by the E.E.O.C. on behalf of 200 women.

United States v. Morrison, 529 U.S. 598 (2000). The U.S. Supreme Court invalidates those portions of the Violence Against Women Act permitting victims of rape, domestic violence, etc. to sue their attackers in federal court.

Timeline from: The National Women's History Project Timeline
Please also see: The National Women's History Project Homepage

2012 

A Capitol Hill hearing that was supposed to be about religious freedom and a mandate that health insurers cover contraception in the United States began as an argument about whether Democrats could add a woman to the all-male panel.

“Where are the women?” the minority Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., asked early in the hearing.
She criticized the Republican committee chairman, Rep. Darrel Issa, for wanting to “roll back the fundamental rights of women to a time when the government thought what happens in the bedroom is their business.”

“We will not be forced back to that primitive era,” she said. Source


2012 - The Alarming War on Women

by Kelly Rivas


Courtesy Jonathan Schmock
http://jonathanschmock.com/republican-things-to-regulate/  

This image makes me laugh on several absurd levels as it sums up the frustrations I face daily.  My work at the non-profit REAP is to promote clean renewable energy while supporting regulations and closures of coal and nuclear power plants.  My life as a woman has been spent promoting inclusion, equality and diversity as I fight disenfranchisement and discrimination from my pay to my body.

It has been almost 40 years since Roe vs. Wade established my right to privacy regarding choices affecting my own body.

Instead of celebrating the progress we have made as a free and equal society however, Republican lawmakers are bent on prioritizing and passing regressive legislation to strip women of privacy, rights and freedom. Adding insult to injury, they are doing so despite the immediate concerns of our unemployed economy and warming planet.

Efforts to redefine rape on a federal level, to mandate unnecessary and non-consensual medical procedures that constitute statutory rape on a state level, and to de-fund and block preventative care services at both levels - are just some of the most violent efforts in this Republican waged War on Women.

In 2011 alone, the Republican controlled U.S. House of Representatives took eight votes on choice related issues - the highest number of recorded votes on choice since 2000.  Similarly, 26 states enacted a total of 69 anti-choice measures - just one short of the most recorded in 1999.

Outside of legislative efforts, there is an increasingly dangerous undercurrent and tone of hatred towards "un-submissive" women in the abusive language used by Right wing voices such as Rush Limbaugh.  This cannot be condoned or allowed to continue on any level.

If we are to continue as leaders of the free world, how can we condone the verbal abuse of women on a national platform? Furthermore, how can we consciously enact legislation that will revoke the rights of an individual in order to protect the freedom of an institution?

This isn't progress and this isn't just about the issue of abortion, this is about the issue of freedom.
This is about the danger of a nation that will put the freedom of an institution before the freedom of its people.

Make no mistake about it - women are being subjected to the abuse of power regarding our fundamental rights and to verbal abuse on a national platform.

As the debate and war continues into this 2012 election, we will see an effort from the Right to change the hot-button issue of abortion and contraception into an issue of religious freedom.  Do not let them off the hook for these egregious actions and language.

Remember, fundamentally this is about preserving an individual's right to freely choose - not an institution's freedom to restrict individual liberty.  This isn't just a woman's issue or a woman's fight - it's yours.

Stand up and march with me in California on April 28th in the Unite Against the War on Women March. Help defend women’s rights and pursuit of equality. Join Americans all across the United States on April 28th, 2012, as we come together as one to tell members of Congress in Washington DC and legislators in all 50 states, “Enough is enough!” And help us gear up for our big march in September in Washington DC!

We Are Warriors and the Birth of a Movement

Soraya Chemaly just published a great piece on the Huffington Post website called, "Women in Politics: Why We Need More Women in Office". The article includes Erin Nanasi's video which 'birthed a movement' of women warriors in the 21st century. Here is a brief excerpt along with the video.
Be Visible and Loud 

The We Are Women March on Washington is being organized to take place on April 28th in all state capitals and the District of Columbia. To be clear: this is not a march against men -- this is a march against systematized sexism. It is a march for equal, human, civil rights for women. Men and women who believe in these rights are good for everyone are marching. Erin Nanasi, a writer, launched the March with her video expressing outrage at the marginalization of women and their interests by conservative politicians and legislators.

If you watched the video please note, despite the fact that this woman is sitting in a kitchen, she is in possession of a brain, has a sense of her own agency and believes she has fundamental rights. Although still nascent, the movements' Facebook page (there are a couple being consolidated), is adding thousands of people daily and has already signed up organizers in almost every state capital.

But it takes more than a march. It takes, as I heard journalist Ann Gerhart recently say, NOT thinking pushing a "Like" button is enough. It takes voting to support the work of organizations like HERvotes. It takes realizing that women shouldn't settle for feeling like they have "enough" equality because they are comparatively less subject to violence, brutality and marginalization as was again recently suggested to me. It requires openly Naming It and Changing It: and not accepting misogyny in Congress and state legislatures masquerading as well-meaning paternalism or "religious freedom." You either have to be ignorant regarding history or a self-aware liar to say "birth control is not about women's rights. It's about religious freedom." And, what it reallymeans is women stepping up, running for office and winning.


You can read the article in it's entirety HERE

New DSCC Ad About the War On Women VIDEO

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee is taking advantage of the controversy over contraception and women's health issues to feature its female office-seekers.

A new ad from the DSCC accuses male Republican candidates for Senate of perpetrating an "assault on women's health and freedom" and focusing on social rather than economic issues.

"It's time to end the culture wars and get to work for the middle class. Time to elect more women to the U.S. Senate," a female narrator says, followed by clips of 11 female Democratic challengers and incumbents up for reelection endorsing the ad.

"Send a Democratic woman to the Senate," the commercial's text reads under portraits of the women. "Send them all." SOURCE